Ediz Hook Salmon Fishing Map

ediz hook

Ediz Hook can be extremely good for winter blackmouth or Summer Chinook. As you can see by the yellow troll line anglers can round the corner from “The Hook” and begin trolling Ediz Hook. During summer months big kings often move shallow into 25 to 45-feet. Typically the blackmouth stay in the 80 to 140-foot contour. This area can hide unseen commercial crab pot buoys so beware and be ready to turn quickly as these buoys are often barely above water.

Blackmouth Spoons

Kingfisher spoons work great here.

Ediz Hook fishes well on an outgoing or incoming tide. The best area, in my opinion starts at the U.S. Coast Guard station and continues West along the spit all the way to the old mill. Like all other areas search for bait and you will find hungry blackmouth. While I like to keep my gear close to bottom, this is an area that has lots of big rocks, lost crab pots and other debris that can ruin your day. With that warning out of the way try to keep your gear close, but not to close, usually within 20 feet off bottom and make sure someone is watching and calling out depths to the angler maintaining depth control.

Best depths: 90 to 140-feet

Best methods: trolling within 10 to 20-feet of bottom.

Best trolling lures: Coho Killers, mini FAT Squids, Squiddy Squids, Kingfisher Spoons and Floochies.

Boat launches: Best access is from Ediz Hook launch or Port of Port Angles launch.

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The Humps Salmon Fishing Map

the humps

The Humps can be outrageously great fishing. The Humps are located between Ediz Hook and Freshwater Bay. As you can see there’s three distinct humps surrounded by deep and shallow water. This is trolling territory and requires your utmost attention to maintain a proper troll. Like most areas you need to keep your lure or bait within a few feet of bottom.

F4 Piscator Flashers

F4 Piscator Salmon Flashers Catch More Salmon

The best troll is the 90 to 140-foot contour and begins at the buoy and continues along the Humps until it turns to the West. I’ve caught fish on both tides, high and low but like many areas of Area 6 I like an outgoing current at the Humps. The shallow area circled in yellow often holds bait and blackmouth but few anglers troll this area because it is only 70 to 90-feet deep. Don’t let the depth stop you from venturing out of the “standard” contour troll line, this shallow area can produce great fishing at times. Again, watch for bait and don’t be afraid to venture shallow or deep in search of the bait. During outgoing tides venture shallow. During incoming the bait could be shallow or deep.

Best depths: 90 to 140-feet.

Best methods: trolling within 5 to 10-feet of bottom.

Best trolling lures: mini FAT Squids, Squiddy Squids, Coho Killers, Kingfisher Spoons and Floochies.

Boat launches: Best access is from Ediz Hook launch or Port of Port Angles launch.

 

Posted in Marine Area 6 Salmon Fishing Maps, Port Angeles Salmon Fishing, Salmon Fishing, Salmon Fishing Maps, Salmon Fishing Tackle, Salmon Fishing Tips & Tricks, Uncategorized, Washington Salmon Fishing | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Freshwater Bay Winter Blackmouth Fishing Map

freshwater bay

Freshwater Bay is by far one of the best areas to fish for winter blackmouth in Area 6. It is my favorite spot and offers scenic, relatively easy trolling because of the shoreline and well defined areas to fish. As you can see from the chart above, the yellow line shows the contour line that holds blackmouth. During heavy current flows anglers typically troll with the current. At the end of the troll pick up your gear and motor back to the start and begin the troll again. If the current is one knot or less you can easily troll both directions, but many anglers still choose to pick up gear and run back to the top of the troll.

Freshwater Bay Salmon Fishing Map

Winter Blackmouth love white and glow mini FAT Squids fished 30 to 36-inches behind flashers.

Both tides, or current flows, will produce fish here. However, my favorite tide here is an outgoing flow. While most anglers end their troll before the sunken ship that shows on your GPS charts, I like to troll around the obstruction toward the buoy.

Best depths here range from 90 to 140-feet, but anglers can also catch fish closer to shore in 50 to 90-feet.

Best methods are trolling within 5 to 10-feet of bottom. Jiggers and moochers also do well here, especially when targeting bait schools.

Best trolling lures include Coho Killers, mini FAT Squids, Squiddy Squids, Kingfisher Spoons and Floochies.

Best Jigs include white Point Wilson Darts or Dungeness Stingers in 2 1/4 to 4 ounce sizes.

Boat launches: There’s a primitive launch at Freshwater Bay, but you need to watch the tides. Best access is from Ediz Hook launch or Port of Port Angles launch.

Posted in Freshwater Bay Salmon Fishing Map, Marine Area 6 Salmon Fishing Maps, Salmon Fishing, Salmon Fishing Maps, Salmon Fishing Tackle, Salmon Fishing Tips & Tricks, Uncategorized, Washington Salmon Fishing | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Winter Blackmouth Fishing Area 6 Washington State

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFebruary 1st winter blackmouth season begins in Marine Area 6. Area 10 closes at the end of the day, 1-19-19 after a short, super good three week season. Area 7 and 9 remain open but will likely close early because of catch rates and “encounters” with native, non-clipped Chinook. Fish checkers at the ramps routinely ask how many hours you fished and how many marked or sub-legal fish you released. These “encounters” count against us because the Washington Department of Fish & Game (WDFW) calculates approximately one dead fish for every seven encounters. They also project an encounters guideline and shut down the fishery when that number is reached.

find baitWhen Area 6 opens February 1st fishing should be fairly decent as long as there’s bait in the area. Like most areas, finding the bait will be key to finding good numbers of blackmouth. Knowing where to look for schools of bait can drive anglers crazy because there’s many productive areas in this portion of the Strait of Juan de Fuca as well as Discovery Bay

When choosing an area to fish drive slowly around the area looking for schools of bait. Also consider the phase of the tide and where bait might be schooled. Before dropping gear make sure there’s bait in the area. Find the bait and you will likely find blackmouth willing to bite your lures or bait.

In the coming days leading up to the Area 6 opener I will post 15 blackmouth fishing charts to cover most of the popular spots, so watch this site or better yet, subscribe to Salmon Chronicles.

John L. Beath, SquidLures.com

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Water-Activated Tail Lights For Flashers

The hot salmon setup right now is a flasher with a blinking light. You don’t have to buy a flasher with a light already installed. Instead, just buy the light. I use a $5 SquidPro Tail Light and put it between the flasher and leader. Works great!
https://www.squidlures.com/lights.html

lights for flashers

flasher-light

Leader lengths will vary according to your lure, speed and currents. Lately I’ve been using a 32 inch leader with spoons and 30 inch leader with mini FAT Squids.

Stay tuned, in the coming days and weeks I have 15 Area 6 salmon charts I will be posting.

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Canada Closes Section of Southern Vancouver Island to All Fishing to Save Orca Whales

The Canadian Government just released new fishing rules, regulations and conservation measures for Northern and Southern BC Chinook salmon in an effort to provide food for southern resident orcas. The map below shows the no fishing zone between the red marks. Effective June 1 to September 30, 2018 there is no fishing for finfish in Subareas 18-2, 18-4, 18-5, 18-9, 19-1 to 19-4 and Area 20. Map below shows Area 20 sub areasNo Fishing Zone

Juan de Fuca (Subareas 19-1 to 19-4 and Area 20):  Effective June 1, 2018 to September 30, 2018 there is no fishing for finfish in Subareas 20-3, 20-4 and that portion of Subarea 20-5 that lies west of 123 degrees 49.30 minutes west longitude (Otter Point) Effective June 1, 2018 until June 28, 2018 the daily limit for Chinook salmon is two (2) per day which may be wild or hatchery marked between 45 and 67 cm fork length or hatchery marked greater than 67 cm in Subareas 19-1 to 19-4 and 20-6 and 20-7 and that portion of Subarea 20-5 that lies east of 123 degrees 49.30 minutes west longitude (Otter Point). Effective June 29, 2018 until July 31, 2018, the daily limit for Chinook salmon is two (2) Chinook per day which may be wild or hatchery marked between 45 and 85 cm or hatchery marked greater than 85 cm in Subareas 19-1 to 19-4 and 20-6 and 20-7 and that portion of Subarea 20-5 that lies east of 123 degrees 49.30 minutes west longitude (Otter Point).

Notes: Additional local closures may be in effect in your area.  Please check for the latest closures and restrictions for your area, and other recreational fishing information at: www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/recfish  Further information on specific management actions by area may be communicated by separate Fishery Notices. You can view or subscribe to fisheries notices at:  http://notices.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fns-sap/index-eng.cfm  www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/recfish FOR MORE INFORMATION:  Contact your local DFO officehttp://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/contact/regions/pacific-pacifique-eng.html

Fishery Notice – Fisheries and Oceans Canada Subject: FN0428-Conservation Measures for Northern and Southern BC Chinook Salmon and Southern Resident Killer Whales This notice provides information on planned conservation measures for Northern and Southern BC Chinook Salmon and Southern Resident Killer Whales that will be implemented beginning June 1, 2018. Chinook Conservation MeasuresTo address Chinook conservation concerns, DFO is implementing a precautionary 25-35% reduction in exploitation rates for Chinook stocks of concern to support conservation and promote rebuilding. These additional reductions are planned to address conservation concerns for Nass River, Skeena River and many small wild Chinook populations in Northern BC; and, all Fraser River Chinook populations (including Spring 4(2), Spring 5(2), Summer 5(2), Summer 4(1) and Fall 4(1) populations) in Southern BC.   Additional Northern BC Chinook management measures are outlined below, followed by additional Southern BC Chinook management measures.

Northern Commercial Fisheries Area F Troll – opening of AABM Chinook fishery delay to July 10 in addition to boundary changes.  Refer to the subsequent Fishery Notice for details.  Northern Recreational Fisheries Please note that possession limits for Chinook Salmon are twice the daily limit. The recreational daily limits of Chinook Salmon are being reduced in North Coast tidal waters as follows: Haida Gwaii: Effective June 1, 2018 to July 9, 2018, the daily limit is one (1) Chinook per day in Areas 1, 2, 142, and that portion of Area 101 west of 131 degrees 40.0 minutes West longitude  North Coast: Effective June 1, 2018 to June 15, 2018, the daily limit is one (1) Chinook per day in Areas 3 to 5, 103 to 105, Subarea 102-1, and that portion of Area 101 east of 131 degrees 40.0 minutes West longitude

Effective June 16, 2018 to July 9, 2018, there is zero (0) retention of Chinook Salmon in Areas 3 to 5, 103 to 105, Subarea 102-1, and that portion of Area 101 east of 131 degrees 40.0 minutes West longitude Effective July 10, 2018 to July 31, 2018, the daily limit is one (1) Chinook per day in Areas 3 to 5, 103 to 105, Subarea 102-1, and that portion of Area 101 east of 131 degrees 40.0 minutes West longitude Effective June 1, 2018 to July 31, 2018 the daily limit is one (1) Chinook per day in Areas 6 and 106 Variation Order Number: 2018-RFQ-0307 Management measures for northern BC non-tidal waters were previously announced in FN0372 issued May 8, 2018.  Southern BC Commercial Fisheries Area G Troll: There is no commercial fishery for AABM Chinook in June or July. Area B Seine and Area H Troll:Effective June 1 to September 30, 2018, there is no commercial salmon fishing in Subareas 20-3, 20-4 and that portion of Subarea 20-5 that lies west of 123 degrees 49.30 minutes west longitude (Otter Point).   Area B Seine and Area H Troll:Effective June 1 to September 30, 2018 there is no commercial salmon fishing in Subareas 18-2, 18-4, 18-5 and 18-9.

Southern BC Recreational Fisheries:

Southern BC Inside Waters Areas 13 to 18, 28 and 29 and Subareas 19-1 to 19-6 (except those portions listed below): Effective June 1, 2018 until September 30, 2018, the daily limit for Chinook Salmon is one (1) per day in in Areas 13 to 17, 28 and 29 with the exception of those four areas listed below under the headings Strait of Georgia, Pender Island, Juan de Fuca and Fraser River mouth.   Terminal fishing opportunities at full limits for Chinook may be considered in-season if abundance permits. Effective October 1, 2018 until further notice, the daily limit for Chinook Salmon is two (2) per day in in Areas 13 to 19, 28 and 29

Exceptions: Strait of Georgia: Note: this measure came into effect on May 7, 2018 as previously announced in FN0370 issued May 7, 2018. Effective immediately until June 28, 2018 the daily limit for Chinook salmon is two (2) per day, of which only one may be greater than 67 cm in Subareas 18-1, 18-3, 18-6, 18-11, and 19-5. Effective June 29, 2018 to July 31, 2018 the daily limit is two (2) Chinook salmon per day between both of which must be less than 85 cm in Subareas 18-1, 18-3, 18-6, 18-11, and 19-5.  Chinook salmon retained in these waters must have a fork length of at least 62 1a

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WDFW denies permit for company to place 800,000 Atlantic salmon into Puget Sound net pens

OLYMPIA – Citing the risk of fish disease transmission, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has denied permission for Cooke Aquaculture to transport 800,000 juvenile Atlantic salmon from its hatchery near Rochester to net pens at Rich Passage in Kitsap County.

In late April, Cooke applied for permission to move juvenile non-native salmon from its hatchery into pens in Kitsap County to replace adult fish that were recently harvested. Washington lawmakers enacted a bill earlier this year that will phase out Atlantic salmon aquaculture by 2022, but Cooke plans to continue to operate until then.

WDFW officials cited two factors in denying the permit that they said would increase the risk of disease transmission within the net pens and possibly to wild and hatchery-raised Pacific salmon outside the pens:

  • The population of Atlantic salmon that would have been transported from Cooke’s hatchery near Rochester tested positive for a form of the fish virus PRV (piscine orthoreovirus) that is essentially the same as the PRV that occurs at the Iceland hatchery from which Cooke receives Atlantic salmon eggs. The Icelandic form of PRV is not known to occur in the eastern Pacific Ocean or Puget Sound, so WDFW classifies it as “exotic” in Washington.
  • Cooke proposed to place fish into pens that have not been empty (or “fallow”) for at least 30 days after the most recent harvest of adult fish, and within a farm that still contains adult Atlantic salmon. These actions would contradict the company’s own management plan.

“Each of these factors raised an unacceptable risk of introducing an exotic strain of PRV into Washington marine waters,” said WDFW fish health manager Ken Warheit. “This would represent an unknown and therefore unacceptable risk of disease transmission.”

Warheit said samples of the juvenile fish that would have been transported were collected by an independent licensed veterinarian under contract with Cooke.  The samples were tested for PRV at the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Washington State University. Test results were confirmed at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Washington Fisheries Research Center.

Until recently, Cooke operated up to nine net pens in Puget Sound, including one at Cypress Island in Skagit County that collapsed last August and allowed approximately 250,000 Atlantic salmon to escape. The company’s latest permit application is not related to the Cypress Island operation or the August mishap.

 

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